12th Annual Conference & Meeting           March 16 - 17, 2020 - Washington, DC

On March 16-17 in Washington, DC, SBCA will host its 2020 Annual Conference. At the core of the experience is a deep selection of educational sessions that allow you to explore the application of benefit-cost analysis across a variety of settings.

SBCA greatly appreciates the work of Susan Dudley, Director, The George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center and Distinguished Professor of Practice, Trachtenberg School of Public Policy & Public Administration for sponsoring the Society’s use of the space.

SBCA 2020 Conference Agenda Now Available Here

Conference registration is now open. Register here.

SBCA Plenary Speaker for 2020 Annual Conference

Binyamin Appelbaum, author of the best-selling book, The Economists’ Hour; False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society, will be a Plenary speaker at the SBCA’s 2020 Annual Conference in Washington, DC.

Appelbaum is the lead writer on business and economics for the Editorial Board of The New York Times.

2019 Conference Agenda & Abstracts

If you would like to view the Abstracts, Agenda, & Video that are from the 2019 Annual Conference & Meeting, they can be found here, and on the Conference page under the 2019 Conference Agenda & Abstract page!

The Society would like to thank everyone involved in helping make the 2019 SBCA Annual Conference a success! The SBCA has uploaded photos from this years Conference onto the SBCA Facebook page.

Blog - Call for Submissions

“On Balance”– the Blog of the Society for Benefit Cost Analysis – provides a venue for members and other practitioners to share their research, experiences, and perspectives on various issues relevant to benefit-cost analysis. We encourage all interested in benefit cost analysis to submit pitches or completed draft blog posts.

Before submitting your pitch or draft blog post, please review Submission Guidelines for Authors, which also includes a description of sample feature types and lengths, and a style guide for posts.

Pitches and draft blog posts may be emailed to Fran Sussman, the editor of On Balance, at info@benefitcostanalysis.org. Please include your name, email address, and a two to three sentence bio. 

On Balance: The Official Blog of the SBCA

On Balance: Review of Investing in Science by Massimo Florio

Outer space probes, radio telescopes, large particle accelerators, genomic platforms, and similar entities are fascinating focal points of intellectual curiosity and discovery.  While we marvel at what we learn from them, we can be taken aback by their costs.  The $150 billion cost for the International Space Station has been shared by taxpayers in the United States, Europe, Russia, Japan, and Canada.  The Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland that enabled the 2012 discovery of the elusive Higgs Boson is estimated to cost about 13.5 billion Euros over the 1993-2025 period for taxpayers in the participating countries.  According to a recent article in The Economist, proposals are being made to build new infrastructures: A Future Circular Collider in Switzerland, an International Linear Collider in Japan, and a Circular Electron-Position Collider in China. Such are the topic of Massimo Florio’s book, Investing in Science: Social Cost-Benefit Analysis of Research Infrastructures.  In it, he demonstrates that benefit-cost analysis (BCA) can be useful in answering the question:  Are these costly research infrastructures worth it?  He draws upon his substantial experience to adapt the traditional framework to the specific characteristics of research infrastructure (RI).  He identifies elements common to RIs, describes how they can be measured and valued, and gives examples from work that he and others have done. This pioneering book fills a gap in that such large-scale investments in science only infrequently have been evaluated using BCA.

To continue reading, check out the On Balance Blog here.

On Balance

The opinions expressed in "On Balance" posts are those of the individual authors and do not represent the views of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis or other organization. The Society is open to proposals for posts on opposing views.