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SBCA Online Workshops

Faculty include world-class authorities from the field of benefit-cost analysis. To enhance the online learning experience, each workshop will be spread over multiple days and provide opportunities for direct engagement with faculty.
 

Upcoming Online Workshops


Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions
July 12, 9:00 am -12:00 pm US ET & July 13, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration Open


Benefit-Cost Analysis for Beginners
September 17, 9:30 -11:30 am and 1:00 -3:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration coming soon

CBA for U.S. Regulatory Impact Statements
October 13 & 14, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time
See additional information below
Registration coming soon


 


Workshop Descriptions
 

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions
 

Cost-Benefit Analysis is increasingly being used to assess the impacts of the environment on human health. The workshop will provide a step-by-step practical guide to the Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions.  During the workshop, we will discuss and illustrate how to conduct a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) using existing guidelines from different countries (EPA, UK guidelines for CBA, and WHO guide for cost-effectiveness analysis of environmental health interventions).  The workshop will start with the description of the economics behind CBA and will combine practical case studies with substantial opportunities for discussion. Participants will develop a basic understanding of Cost-Benefit Analysis and its application to a wide range of environmental health interventions (e.g. remediation of polluted sites, interventions targeting air pollution, etc).

About the presenters:

  • Carla Guerriero is an Assistant Professor at the Economics University of Naples Federico II. Since 2009, her research and teaching focus on the methodology and the application of Cost-Benefit Analysis to  Environmental Health Interventions and on the development of novel techniques to value children’s health.  Carla has published her research in national and international research journals including Ecological Economics, Journal for Environmental Management, Plos One, The European Journal of Health Economics, and Environmental Health. Carla conducted the first cost-benefit analysis of remediating polluted sites and she authored the book: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Environmental Health Interventions published by Academic Press in 2020.

  • Marco Martuzzi is the Head of the Asia-Pacific Centre for Environment and Health of the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific. He is an epidemiologist with experience in environmental and occupational studies. He previously worked at the Italian Institute of Health, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Imperial College School of Medicine (UK), the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (France), and at the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health, in Bonn, Germany. He obtained a Ph.D. in community medicine from the University of London, in 1996. His current work is concerned with the impacts of environmental risk factors and determinants on health and health equity, with a view to addressing the pressing challenges of the Anthropocene, such as climate and ecosystem breakdown.

  • Stefano Papirio is a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Sanitary and Environmental Engineering at the University of Naples Federico II. Born in 1986, Stefano Papirio got his M.Sc. degree with honors in Environmental Engineering in 2009 at the University of Naples Federico II and obtained his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering in 2013 at the University of Cassino and Southern Lazio. Former research assistant at UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education (Delft, The Netherlands) in 2009, Dr. Papirio worked almost three years at Tampere University of Technology (Tampere, Finland) as visiting Ph.D. student and then as a Post-Doc researcher from 2011 to 2014. In 2013, he won the Italian Award for the best doctoral thesis in the Sanitary and Environmental Engineering disciplines. In August-September 2018, he was invited as visiting researcher at the National University of Ireland (Galway, Ireland). He has been co-coordinator of two European Joint Doctorate projects in the Erasmus Mundus and Marie Curie H2020 ITN frameworks. He is a coordinator at UNINA of the CEOMED project funded within the ENI CBC MED program. He is co-author of 60 peer-review publications indexed in Scopus, with 1,100 citations and H-index of 21.

  • John Wright is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Public Policy at the University of Technology in Sydney. He completed his Ph.D. in the Department of Government at the Centre for Public Policy at the University of Melbourne.  John has held post-doctoral appointments at the University of Birmingham in the Department of Public Health and Epidemiology working on area-based regeneration schemes, with a focus on participation, decentralization, and methods and processes for health and environmental impact assessments. He also completed post-doctoral work at the Regulatory Institutions Network in the Research School Social Sciences, Australian National University, on regulation and governance theory. John was a lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Policy working on the regulation and new governance arrangements of acute English hospitals. From 2010-2017, John was a Senior Research Fellow, then an Associate Professorial Research Fellow, in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science in pharmaceutical regulation, European methods and processes for technology assessment, European investment, and research in non-Communicable Diseases, and European Public Spending reform.

Dates and Times:
July 12, 9:00 am -12:00 pm US ET & July 13, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm US ET

Fee:
Regular registration: $300 per person
Low-and middle-income country residents: $100 per person (Based on World Bank Classification
Students (fulltime): $50 per person

Registration Open
 


 

Benefit-Cost Analysis for Beginners

This short course will provide an introduction for 'beginners' who have not previously had formal instruction in BCA. It is designed to help those who encounter BCA to better understand its purpose and methods as well as those who are curious about how it might be useful in their work. Although some prior exposure to economics would be helpful, the workshop is designed to be accessible to a general audience. Upon completion of the workshop, attendees should have a clear understanding of the purpose, underlying concepts, strengths, and weaknesses of BCA.
 
The workshop will compare BCA to other analytical approaches commonly employed by policy analysts to put it into perspective. It will also introduce and explain a number of key BCA concepts including standing (whose costs and benefits count), incremental costs and benefits (clear alternatives to current policy), opportunity cost (what we give up to do the alternative), willingness to pay (how much people value the impacts of the alternative), 'shadow prices' (monetizing impacts), discounting (taking account of the timing of costs and benefits), and sensitivity analysis (taking account of uncertainty). Several examples of BCAs will be distributed prior to the workshop to provide illustrations of concepts and facilitate discussion among attendees.

About the presenters:

  • Glenn C. Blomquist is Carl F. Pollard Professor of Health Economics and Professor of Economics and Public Policy Emeritus at the University of Kentucky.  His work deals with valuation of risks to human health, urban and environmental amenities, and BCA. He has been a Fulbright Scholar in Latvia and visiting professor at Stockholm School of Economics and University of Chicago. He is the former editor of the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis. He is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University, B.A., Ohio State University, M.A., and the University of Chicago, Ph.D. 

  • David L. Weimer is Edwin E. Witte Professor of Political Economy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His recent research addresses topics in health policy and governance. He is the author of Behavioral Economics for Cost-Benefit Analysis (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and co-author of Cost-Benefit Analysis 5th ed. (Cambridge University Press, 2018). He served as president of the Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis (2013) and the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (2006) and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.  He is a graduate of the University of Rochester and earned his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dates and Times:
September 17, 9:30 -11:30 am and 1:00 -3:00 pm US eastern time

Fee:
Regular registration: $300 per person
Low-and middle-income country residents: $100 per person (Based on World Bank Classification
Students (fulltime): $50 per person


CBA for U.S. Regulatory Impact Statements
 

Benefit-cost analysis is used around the world to assess regulatory impacts. This workshop introduces the use of Benefit-Cost Analysis for Regulatory Impact Analyses (RIAs) in the Federal government. The topics will include issues of identifying the market failure, establishing the correct baseline, choosing the policy options, estimating benefits, estimating costs, and identifying transfers. The focus will on analyses of U.S. health, and safety regulations issued by the Department of Health and Human Services, with further examples from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the last two decades, but the concepts and practices we discuss are equally applicable to analyses conducted in other policy areas and in other countries or at a sub-national level. The workshop will be structured as an overarching presentation with examples from past RIAs used as practical example to be discussed by the participants.

This workshop is intended for both economists and other practitioners who have a working knowledge of Benefit-Cost Analysis and the general concept of measuring welfare effects. This working knowledge will then be applied to the Regulatory Impact Analysis context. The presenters are seasoned practitioners with substantial experience in conducting these analyses for federal regulatory actions

About the presenters:
  • Aliya Sassi earned her PhD in Economics at the University of New Hampshire. She is a Senior Economist at the U.S. FDA where she serves as a subject matter expert, project lead, and economic consultant to top level management and develops benefit-cost analyses of FDA regulations. Her areas of expertise include regulatory impact analysis, food safety, international trade, and economic modeling. Previously, she has detailed as a Senior Economist at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and as an Assistant Director of Economics at FDA and taught economics at the University of New Hampshire.
     
  • Lizzi Quin earned her PhD in Economics at Michigan State University. At the FDA she has developed benefit-cost analyses for drug, medical device, animal drug, biologics, and tobacco regulations. Previously, she has detailed at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She is currently an Assistant Director of Economics at FDA and oversees benefit-costs analyses covering all FDA-regulated products. 
     
  • Chris Dockins earned his PhD in Economics at Duke University, focusing on Environmental Economics and Public Finance. At the EPA he has helped develop benefit-cost analyses for EPA's air, water, hazardous waste, and chemicals regulations, performed and published research on related topics, and directed a division of scientists in EPA's National Center for Environmental Economics. He also teaches benefit-cost analysis at Johns Hopkins University and environmental economics at the University of Maryland.
     
  • Charles Griffiths earned his PhD in Economics at the University of Maryland. At the EPA he has worked on the estimation of the social cost of carbon and helped develop benefit-cost analysis for EPA’s air, water, and chemical regulation. He has conducted research on climate change, health risks, water regulations, air regulations, and voluntary programs and was a Senior Economist for Environment, Energy, and Agriculture at the President's Council of Economic Advisors. He also teaches benefit-cost analysis at Johns Hopkins University and environmental economics at the University of Maryland.
     
  • Aaron Kearsley did his graduate work in Economics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Aaron is a Senior Economist at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services within the office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, which reviews all regulatory impact analyses for the Department and its agencies prior to publication. He was previously an economist at FDA, specializing in drug and tobacco regulations.
Date and Times: 
October 13 & 14, 11:00 am -1:00 pm US eastern time

Fee:
Regular registration: $300 per person
Low-and middle-income country residents: $100 per person (Based on World Bank Classification
Students (fulltime): $50 per person
 

Please Note
Registration will be capped.
 Please register soon to ensure your spot. Check back periodically for additional information and offerings.

Supporting SBCA
It is generous donations from people like you who make these offerings possible.  Please consider joining our efforts to strengthen the benefit-cost analysis profession through membership and/or by making a donation.